Consumerization

10.30.11//19:23
Profile after profile the accidental architect of consumerization, Steve Jobs.

Profile after profile the accidental architect of consumerization, Steve Jobs.

(via nprfreshair)


9.26.11//08:43

Mobilize 2011 video livestream #mobilizeconf

Watch live streaming video from mobilize2011 at livestream.com

This week (Monday + Tuesday) is Mobilize 2011, a conference dedicated to the emerging consumer and enterprise changes coming at us in mobile. We’re particularly interested in the sessions relating to consumerization.

We’ve plucked out the most relevant sessions and times for consumerization of IT topics from the full Mobilize schedule website, which you should check out. :

Monday

9:20 AM TABLETS AND SMARTPHONES BY THE NUMBERS

The growing popularity of smartphones and tablets has opened up new opportunities for mobile content and apps – and raises critical questions, as well. Do different platforms and devices require different monetization strategies or does it depend on which demographic group you are trying to reach? How do different kinds of consumers respond to mobile ads? How much are consumers willing to pay for various types of content? How effective are mobile ads? These questions and more are revealed by audience research giant, The Nielsen Company. Speakers: Jonathan Carson - GM, Digital, Nielsen

Tuesday

9:05 AM THE $20 BILLION UPSET

There’s a new force to be reckoned with in the enterprise: the consumerization of IT. The rise of mobile products such as the iPhone, iPad and Android platforms — along with the easy accessibility of cloud computing services — is radically disrupting conventional IT infrastructures. Resistance is futile. The network and content security industry is estimated to be worth more than $20 billion by 2015, and as advances in technology turn this industry upside down, smart and agile enterprises stand to realize considerable competitive advantages by recognizing the new shape of IT architecture and the value of a seamless user experience. This talk between Cisco Security’s VP/GM Tom Gillis and the New York Times’ Quentin Hardy will delve deeper into the infinite number of possible responses demanded of IT departments. Moderated by: Quentin Hardy - Deputy Tech Editor, The New York Times Speakers: Tom Gillis - VP and GM Security Technology Business Unit, Cisco

9:45 AM WILL ENTERPRISE BE THE GAME CHANGER FOR HTML 5 AND TABLET APPS?

For companies that have embraced device diversity, the decision to go with native or web-based mobile apps can cause analysis paralysis. While native apps provide richer functionality, in-house app developers have already standardized on HTML as the platform of choice for building B2B apps. Will enterprise lead the way in using cross-platform mobile development tools and mobile middleware platforms to get the job done? There is much anticipation and hype about the entry of tablet devices into the enterprise. Yet we are seeing very little innovation of applications that actually take advantage of the tablet’s benefits. Is the future of the tablet simply replacing existing game consoles and e-readers, or will productivity be the app that really makes use of the tablet form factor? Moderated by: Nathan Clevenger - Chief Software Architect, ITR Mobility Speakers: Santiago Becerra - Co-Founder and CEO, MeLLmo Adam Blum - CEO, Rhomobile Chris Kemmerer - Director, Mobility Solutions, Verizon Sean Whiteley - SVP, salesforce.com

10:25 AM 3 KEY PILLARS OF ENTERPRISE MOBILITY: APPLICATIONS, DATA AND PEOPLE

Virtualization and high-powered smartphones are a match made in heaven for the enterprise. Most of the arguments involving security and data integrity disappear. We talk with the visionary CTO and thought leader at technology giant VMware about what he sees as the real outcomes of virtualization on the handset and where VMware will lead the industry next. Moderated by: Stacey Higginbotham - Senior Writer, GigaOM Speakers: Stephen Herrod - CTO, VMware

4:05 PM MOBILIZING YOUR BUSINESS: CHALLENGE OR OPPORTUNITY?

Though mobility is a hot topic in the tech world, organizations are still grappling with some of the most basic issues around mobility in the workplace. In fact, enterprise IT is reaching the end of the first chapter of this mobile transformation. Organizations are beginning to realize they need to look beyond mobile device management to a broader, more strategic opportunity to manage the mobile enterprise. This panel covers mobile device management, mobile application management, tablets, mobile cloud computing, security and more. Moderated by: Philippe Winthrop - Managing Director, The Enterprise Mobility Foundation Speakers: Chuck Goldman - Founder and Chief Strategy Officer, Apperian John Herrema - SVP of Corporate Strategy, Good Technology Julie Palen - SVP, Strategic Business Development and Mobile Device Management, Tangoe Bob Tinker - CEO, MobileIron


9.15.11//21:23

Recent bump aside, Blackberry keeps getting cheaper

Despite moving away from its enterprise IT image and adopting a consumer-friendly brand as early 2005, RIM can’t seem to slow down Blackberry’s descent.

mattrichman:

RIM just reported earnings for its second fiscal quarter of 2012. 73% of its $4.2 billion in revenue came from the sale of hardware, which includes Blackberrys and Playbooks. That means RIM brought in $3.066 billion from hardware sales.

RIM shipped 10.6 million Blackberrys and 200,000 Playbooks. Assuming the average selling price of a Playbook is $554 (what I used last quarter), then RIM brought in $2.9552 billion in revenue from the sale of 10.6 million Blackberrys.

That means the average selling price of a Blackberry this quarter was $278.79. It rose 3.80% over last quarter’s $268.56, but it’s still down 7.76% over the last six months.

The following chart shows the average selling price of a Blackberry since 2009:

A 27.41% drop in less than three years.


9.02.11//09:42
rankandfile:

A generation of 1099 independents, as opposed to W2 permanents, by definition is a Bring Your Own Computer (BYOC) workforce.
These workers are buying computers individually, not negotiating 10000 seat contracts with Microsoft and Dell.
theatlantic:

The Freelance Surge Is the Industrial Revolution of Our Time

It’s been called the Gig Economy, Freelance Nation, the Rise of the Creative Class, and the e-conomy, with the “e” standing for electronic, entrepreneurial, or perhaps eclectic. Everywhere we look, we can see the U.S.workforce undergoing a massive change. No longer do we work at the same company for 25 years, waiting for the gold watch, expecting the benefits and security that come with full-time employment. We’re no longer simply lawyers, or photographers, or writers. Instead, we’re part-time lawyers-cum- amateur photographers who write on the side.
Today, careers consist of piecing together various types of work, juggling multiple clients, learning to be marketing and accounting experts, and creating offices in bedrooms/coffee shops/coworking spaces. Independent workers abound. We call them freelancers, contractors, sole proprietors, consultants, temps, and the self-employed.
And, perhaps most surprisingly, many of them love it.

Read more at The Atlantic

rankandfile:

A generation of 1099 independents, as opposed to W2 permanents, by definition is a Bring Your Own Computer (BYOC) workforce.

These workers are buying computers individually, not negotiating 10000 seat contracts with Microsoft and Dell.

theatlantic:

The Freelance Surge Is the Industrial Revolution of Our Time

It’s been called the Gig Economy, Freelance Nation, the Rise of the Creative Class, and the e-conomy, with the “e” standing for electronic, entrepreneurial, or perhaps eclectic. Everywhere we look, we can see the U.S.workforce undergoing a massive change. No longer do we work at the same company for 25 years, waiting for the gold watch, expecting the benefits and security that come with full-time employment. We’re no longer simply lawyers, or photographers, or writers. Instead, we’re part-time lawyers-cum- amateur photographers who write on the side.

Today, careers consist of piecing together various types of work, juggling multiple clients, learning to be marketing and accounting experts, and creating offices in bedrooms/coffee shops/coworking spaces. Independent workers abound. We call them freelancers, contractors, sole proprietors, consultants, temps, and the self-employed.

And, perhaps most surprisingly, many of them love it.

Read more at The Atlantic

(via rankandfile)


9.01.11//21:04
"

During VMworld this week, talk of consumerization — or the rise of consumer applications and devices in corporate settings — was everywhere, stemming from VMware CEO Paul Maritz’s and CTO Steve Herrod’s mobile- and application-centric keynotes.

Included in Herrod’s presentation was talk of a new Dropbox-like application called Project Octopus that will let users safely store, access and share corporate documents. It all so sounded so promising, and then someone asked me whether it will actually get used. If employees already use Dropbox, she asked, why would they want to use a different service to do essentially the same thing while at work?

The truth is that I don’t know. I can see why employers would want them to use a separate service, but will employees stand for it? I tend to agree with my colleague Stacey Higginbotham, who noted while reporting on VMware’s mobile play, “While enterprises will love the ability to control who can access their data, employees may not want to give up the ability to use their own tools and choose who they share their files with.” Of course, it’s not so much a question about Dropbox or Project Octopus as much as it is about the role of consumer applications in corporate settings in general.

"

How far can consumerization go for enterprise apps? — Cloud Computing News


20:59

Smartphones make up 40% of all mobile phones in the U.S.

That’s a lot of consumers with ubiquitous Internet access.

shortformblog:

poweredbytech:

According to data from Nielsen, 40% of mobile users over 18 in the United States now carry a smartphone. Android carries a 40% share of those smartphone owners, follwed by Apple at 28% and RIM falling to 19%. Windows Mobile users still far exceed Windows Phone 7 users at a 7:1 ratio.

Read More

Under the fold is perhaps the more interesting bit: Amongst those who plan on getting a smartphone in the future, more intend to purchase Android phones than iPhones.

(Source: blog.nielsen.com, via shortformblog)


09:14
CNNMoney Tech Tumblr: $5 comics now with Photoshop-like serial numbers →

We suppose this is the opposite of consumerization. A hyper-formalized ritual to conduct a tiny transaction mostly reserved for children.

cnnmoneytech:

Photo by CNNMoney

This is the inside back cover of DC Comics’ Justice League #1, released yesterday. The publisher expects people to input 32 characters to download the digital version.

That’s a total of 1.53249554 × 1054 different combinations (thanks Google!). The number is so large…


8.29.11//11:02

Consumerization at VMworld 2011 for Monday

If you’re not at VMworld today, and following along at home, there are a few topics you’ll want to check out in the area of consumerization:

Update: For some reason, the VMworld Live Community site has changed its video embed to point to recorded shorts, not the live “theCube” interviews anymore. So we’ve updated the link to point to SiliconANGLE. which always has whatever they’re managing live (this week, VMworld).


09:48

What Steve Jobs does on his first day off?

What does one of the world’s most creative business geniuses do now that he’s not perfecting our consumer devices?

cnnmoneytech:


Screenshot by CNNMoney

The Joy of Tech has what they say is Steve Jobs’ calendar now that he is no longer CEO of Apple. I kind of wish “Emperor Mode” was a real thing on Face Time… - Matt


8.25.11//20:14
The Steve Jobs patents for consumer electronics. I’m sure many of us can go over this list and say, “I have that, got that, bought that, gave that as a present, got it, got it. Almost bought it…”
neuropsy:

Steve Jobs patents
Steve Jobs stepped down as CEO of Apple yesterday, and one of the reasons we actually care is because he had a hand in so many major products that we use every day. Shan Carter and Alan McLean, for The New York Times, provide a breakdown of all 313 Apple patents that include Jobs in the group of inventors.

The Steve Jobs patents for consumer electronics. I’m sure many of us can go over this list and say, “I have that, got that, bought that, gave that as a present, got it, got it. Almost bought it…”

neuropsy:

Steve Jobs patents

Steve Jobs stepped down as CEO of Apple yesterday, and one of the reasons we actually care is because he had a hand in so many major products that we use every day. Shan Carter and Alan McLean, for The New York Timesprovide a breakdown of all 313 Apple patents that include Jobs in the group of inventors.

(Source: flowingdata.com, via wrkhrsmusic)


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